How much does first aid at work training cost?

Written by James Reed
Jan 6, 2020

James is a Training Product Manager at Red Cross Training responsible for the development and review of our training products.

The cost of first aid at work training varies depending on the outcome of your first aid needs assessment. In order to be compliant with The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981, any appointed first-aiders must undertake a first aid at work course to become adequately trained to perform first aid at work. There are five core factors that affect the cost of training: the number of staff that require training, the number of sites within your business, the level of risk within your workplace, the type of first aid course you require, and the number of first-aiders that require renewal courses.

The factors that affect the cost of first aid at work training

Before choosing your first aid at work training provider, you need to be aware of these five factors that affect the overall cost of first aid training.

1.   Number of staff

The HSE guidelines state that you should consider ‘the nature and size of your workforce’ when determining the provisions that need to be put in place for first aid. Where the outcome of your first aid needs assessment identifies the need for multiple first-aiders due to a large number of employees on site, you will have to provide training for each first-aider.

Furthermore, the HSE also strongly recommends that duty holders take into account any unscheduled absences, annual leave and shift patterns when selecting first-aiders; meaning that additional first-aiders will be required to cover these various circumstances. This will inevitably impact the overall cost of first aid at work training, because more first-aiders will need to complete a first aid at work course. However, if you have a group of up to twelve people who need first aid or health and safety training, you could save time and money by booking as a group.

To find out if you qualify for a group booking, request a callback to speak to one of our first aid training advisers > 

2.   Number of sites

If you have multiple sites, then more employees will need to have first aid provisions, generally meaning that more first-aiders are required - which affects the overall cost of training. This cost can further increase when multiple sites have different first aid requirements.

For example, if your business consists of an office and a warehouse, the first-aiders located at the two sites may require different first aid at work training due to the differing risks and requirements of each environment. This may require duty holders to book first-aiders from separate sites on two different courses, which could increase overall cost. However, duty holders can reduce the overall cost of first aid at work by enrolling multiple first-aiders under a group booking to complete courses on-site, instead of undertaking scheduled training sessions.

Training larger groups of first-aiders in your workplace is not only cost-effective, but also allows your first-aiders to practice first aid in their actual working environment. This helps them gain a more in-depth understanding of their role within the workplace, which gives duty holders peace of mind that their first-aiders are competent to perform their role.

3.   Level of risk

The level of risk of your workplace will be determined by the outcome of your first aid needs assessment. For example, if the duty holder of a high risk environment (such as a factory or warehouse) with five hundred workers were to undertake a first aid needs assessment and identify the need for multiple first-aiders as a result, each of these first-aiders will need to complete a first aid at work course specific to the risks of the work being undertaken.

This can increase the overall cost of first aid at work training, which is driven by the requirements outlined in your first aid needs assessment.

First-aiders needing to be trained in more dangerous environments will likely need to complete a three day first aid at work training course, and may even need to undertake a more bespoke course where additional specific workplace risks can be addressed. While these cost more than a standard course, they will ensure that your first-aiders are competent to perform any first aid required within your working environment.

4.   Type of first aid at work course

The type of first aid course you need will depend entirely on the requirements outlined in your first aid needs assessment. The majority of duty holders will have to enroll employees on either a one day Emergency First Aid at Work course, or a three day First Aid at Work course, however some specialised work environments may require more specific training. The cost of each of these courses is different; while the one day course has the lowest cost, this course is only recommended to companies with very low risk environments where a more in-depth course isn’t required by the first aid needs assessment.

5.   Renewing a first aid at work course

All first aid at work qualifications last for three years, therefore it is a legal requirement for first-aiders to undertake renewal courses. The HSE also strongly recommends that first-aiders undertake annual refresher training, over half a day, during any three-year certification period. Although this isn’t mandatory, it will help qualified first-aiders maintain their skills and keep up to date with any changes to first-aid procedures.

The cost of these courses is the same as the original first aid at work course, so there is no additional charge.

These are just some of the factors that affect the overall price of first aid at work training. However, to find out exactly how much it will cost, you need to consider the outcome of your first aid needs assessment and calculate overall price based on the outcome. To get a free, no obligation quote follow the link below to speak to one of our first aid training advisors.

Speak to a first aid training provider

Topics: First Aid

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